Habakkuk Chart

This post looks at the book of Habakkuk. It is one of the shorter books in the Bible but has several profound verses. This is an example of a way to chart the book of Habakkuk. Obviously, there are several different ways but this is just my attempt at it. This charting method is typically called a synthetic chart, but some may call it by a slightly different name.

Habakkuk chart picture

Historical Background on the Book of Philemon

While there are many better and greater summaries on the book of Philemon, this is just my attempt as a first year seminary student to capture the essence of Philemon. The task of this assignment was to know more about the writing, i.e. who was the author, what was their experience and background, who was the book intended for and why, and what is the purpose of this book. Part of this assignment is to look at various commentaries/encyclopedias/dictionaries and provide a synopsis of the relevant material. Philemon is one of the shorter books in the Bible but it is full of some wonderful words of wisdom, especially applicable for today regarding how to glorify God the Father while working in a corporate setting.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF PHILEMON

  • Author
    • Family heritage
      • Paul, originally named Saul, was born of a Pharisee in the Gentile city of Tarsus which is part of Cilicia between the years A.D. 0 and A.D. 5.[1]
  • Educational background
    • Though born in Tarsus, Paul mentions in Acts that we was “brought up” in Jerusalem, where learned “at the feet of Gamaliel,” who was one of the most eminent teachers of the law at that time.[2]
  • Occupational skills
    • At Tarsus he learned the trade of “tent-maker” which he would occasionally use after his conversion to make a living.[3] He was known in Jerusalem as a student. He knew Aramaic as well as Greek (and Latin), and could speak Aramaic well enough to attract the attention of a Jewish audience.[4]
  • Cultural advantages
    • Paul was born with the freedom of a Roman citizen in Tarsus, a city known for its distinguished philosophy and education. Paul also had Greek citizenship which included advantages such as, “adaptability, curiosity, alertness, love of investigation… He learned to speak the vernacular like a native.”[5] In Jerusalem, he was fully immersed in the Jewish culture and learned the law from one of the greatest Jewish teachers.
  • Religious experiences
    • Saul grew as a Pharisee and became a zealot, a persecutor of Christians until a life-changing journey to Damascus. After a vision of Jesus Christ, he became one of the greatest followers of Christ. Traveling on three missionary journeys, he took the Gospel of Christ to all parts of the known world. He discipled and mentored young pastors like Timothy, started churches, performed miracles, was persecuted, imprisoned and almost killed multiple times yet continued to preach the Gospel. He is one of the most important figures in Christianity, especially in the early church.
  • Audience
    • The people—believers/unbelievers, Jews/Gentiles, etc.
      • This was a private letter to Philemon, a fellow worker and convert of Paul, in regards to his slave, Onesimus.[6] Philemon, along with his wife Apphia and son Archippus, would lead of group of Christian converts at their home in the Gentile city of Colosse.[7]
    • Location—where are they? Provide information about their locale.
      • The Letter to Philemon was written by Paul to Philemon who lived in Colosse. A city of Phrygia in Asia Minor (modern day Turkey) on the Lycus River, a branch of the Meander. Hierapolis and Laodicea were in its immediate neighborhood.[8]
    • When was the book written?
      • The beautiful and intimate letter to Philemon is one of the four captivity letters, the others being Ephesians, Colossians and Philippians, that Paul wrote during his first captivity in Rome, which most believe was written around A.D. 63 or early A.D. 64.[9]
    • Their problems—social, spiritual, etc.
      • Onesimus, which means “useful,” a slave under Philemon, had run away from him or possibly robbed Philemon as implied in verse 18.[10] Onesimus fled to Rome where he was converted by Paul. Onesimus, had become a great help to Paul, but Paul knew it was right for Onesimus to return to Philemon.

The purpose of the book

  • “Paul writes this letter of intercession for Onesimus; having returned to God, he now returns to his master, who will have more service and better hold of him than ever-by conscience of his duty and faithfulness in it to his life’s end; his interest therefore it will be now to receive him.”[11] Paul seeing the usefulness of Onesimus and wanting to keep him as a helper, understands the importance of reconciling the relationship. Paul, not wanting to use his authority over Philemon pleads for him to take Onesimus back not as a slave but as a brother in Christ, even willing to assume the financial responsibility for Onesimus’ wrongdoing.[12] The book of Philemon shows the tender appeal of forgiveness.

[1] William Smith, “Smith’s Bible Dictionary: Entry for Paul,” Bible Study Tools, Internet, available from http://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionaries/smiths-bible-dictionary/paul.html, accessed on 2 March 2014.

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

[4] James Orr, “Paul the Apostle,” International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Internet, available from http://www.internationalstandardbible.com/P/paul-the-apostle-4.html, accessed on 2 March 2014.

[5] Ibid.

[6] James Orr, “Philemon, Epistle to,” International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Internet, available from http://www.internationalstandardbible.com/P/philemon-epistle-to.html, accessed 2 March 2014.

[7] Ibid.

[8] William Smith, “Smith’s Bible Dictionary: Entry for Colosse,” Bible Study Tools, Internet, available from http://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionaries/smiths-bible-dictionary/colosse.html, accessed on 2 March 2014.

[9] Smith, “Smith’s Bible Dictionary: Entry for Colosse.”

[10] Frank Thompson, The Thompson Chain-Reference Study Bible, (Indianapolis: B.B. Kirkbride Bible Co., Inc, 1990), 1678.

[11] Matthew Henry, “Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible (Complete): Entry for Philemon,” Bible Study Tools, Internet, available from http://www.biblestudytools.com/commentaries/matthew-henry-complete/philemon/1.html, accessed on 2 March 2014.

[12] Orr, “Philemon, Epistle to.”

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Henry, Matthew. “Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible (Complete): Entry for Philemon.” Bible Study Tools. Internet. Available from http://www.biblestudytools.com/ commentaries/matthew-henry- complete/philemon/1.html, accessed on 2 March 2014.

Orr, James. “Paul the Apostle.” International Standard Bible Encyclopedia. Internet. Available from http://www.internationalstandardbible.com/P/paul-the-apostle-4.html, accessed on 2 March 2014.

Orr, James. “Philemon, Epistle to.” International Standard Bible Encyclopedia. Internet. Available from http://www.internationalstandardbible.com/P/philemon-epistle-to.html, accessed 2 March 2014.

Smith, William. “Smith’s Bible Dictionary: Entry for Colosse.” Bible Study Tools. Internet. Available from http://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionaries/smiths-bible-dictionary/colosse.html, accessed on 2 March 2014.

Smith, William. “Smith’s Bible Dictionary: Entry for Paul.” Bible Study Tools. Internet. Available from http://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionaries/smiths-bible-dictionary/paul.html, accessed on 2 March 2014.

Thompson, Frank. The Thompson Chain-Reference Study Bible. Indianapolis: B.B. Kirkbride Bible Co., Inc, 1990.

Observation, Outline and Summary of Nehemiah 1:4-11

This Post covers part of the book of Nehemiah. It looks first at different observations for Nehemiah 1:4-11, but also has two additional sections. The second section covers an outline for this part of Nehemiah, while the final section concludes with a compare and contrast between the beginning and end of this section. This focuses on how the writer changes in mood, tone.

Part 1: Observations about Nehemiah 1:4-11 (NASB)

Nehemiah 1:4

When I heard these words, I sat down and wept and mourned for days; and I was fasting and praying before the God of heaven.

  1. “When” is a temporal word of connection describing a word of time.
  2. “I” indicates that this is a biographical structure.
  3. This verse also represents a historical structure.
  4. “These words” indicates that he was told something in a prior verse.
  5. The atmosphere in this verse is one of sadness.
  6. “When I heard these words, I sat down” is an example of an explanation or analysis law.
  7. “When I heard these words” is an example of a preparation or introduction law.
  8. “I sat down and wept and mourned for days” is an example of a continuation law.
  9. “I sat down and wept and mourned for days” is the independent clause.
  10. “And I was fasting and praying before the God of heaven” is the dependent clause.
  11. The cause of the author sitting down and weeping is the words he had heard.
  12. The effect of “these words” is the author weeping, mourning, fasting and praying.
  13. The clauses are an example of the causation law.

Nehemiah 1:5

I said, “I beseech You, O Lord God of heaven, the great and awesome God, who preserves the covenant and lovingkindness for those who love Him and keep His commandments,

  1. “You, O Lord God of heaven, the great and awesome God” is an example of the law of continuity.
  2. “Covenant” and “commandments” describes the law of continuation.
  3. “I said” indicates the law of preparation or introduction.
  4. “Who preserves the covenant and lovingkindness for those who love Him and keep His commandments” indicates the law of causation and substantiation by the audience loves God and keeps His commands, God will preserve the covenant.
  5. This verse indicates the law of proportion by the number of times God is emphasized.
  6. “Beseech” indicates the author knows only God can help him.
  7. “Beseech” also indicates a time of great need for the author.
  8. The author begins his prayer by exalting God and reminding himself who God is.
  9. The author’s use of describing God as “great and awesome” and His sustenance in the statement “preserves the covenant and lovingkindness” is an example of the law of instrumentation which will be shown later in verses nine and ten.
  10. “Commandments” indicates a set of rules for the people to follow.
  11. “Covenant” indicates that God is a God of truth and made an agreement with those “who love Him.”

Nehemiah 1:6

let Your ear now be attentive and Your eyes open to hear the prayer of Your servant which I am praying before You now, day and night, on behalf of the sons of Israel Your servants, confessing the sins of the sons of Israel which we have sinned against You; I and my father’s house have sinned.

  1. The speaker continues his attitude of humility as seen in the previous verse.
  2. The speaker recognizes himself as a servant.
  3. The law of continuation is shown here as the speaker continues the thought of the divine “You”.
  4. “Before” is a word of connection that indicates time.
  5. The speaker indicates that the “sons of Israel are also servants of God.
  6. The terms “now, day and night” describe the law of particularization and generalization by mentioning praying “day and night” in general, but indicating the particular time of “now.
  7. The law of particularization and generalization is also shown in the general form of confessing the sins of the “sons of Israel” and the particular in stating “I and my father’s house have sinned.”
  8. The law of harmony is indicated here by the way that God can hear the speaker’s prayer is by having attentive ears and open eyes.
  9. The speaker confesses that he and the “sons of Israel” have broken that covenant and commandments that were mentioned in the previous verse.
  10. The verse indicates the geography of where these events are taking place.
  11. The verse indicates the speaker’s closeness or familiarity with the “sons of Israel”.

Nehemiah 1:7

We have acted very corruptly against You and have not kept the commandments, nor the statutes, nor the ordinances which You commanded Your servant Moses.

  1. The theme of breaking commandments and sinning is continued from previous verses into this verse, which is an example of the law on continuation.
  2. “We” is the speaker speaking on behalf of himself and the sons of Israel from the previous verse.
  3. “You” is the “great and awesome God” mentioned in verse 5.
  4. The “nor” statements are a series of facts.
  5. This verse indicates the law of causation and substantiation by tying verse six together with this verse in that verse six describes the confessing (effect) and verse seven the corruption (cause).
  6. This verse indicates that Moses was a leader that received the commands from God.
  7. This verse also describes the law of explanation or analysis by explaining the need for confession from the previous verse.
  8. The verse points to the hinge or pivot point of the prayer, which indicates the law of cruciality. The reason for the scattering of people mentioned in verses eight and nine is because they “acted very corruptly”.
  9. The terms “commandments”, “statutes” and “ordinances” indicate the law on continuity.
  10. The speaker recognizes the “You” or God as a king or ruler.
  11. The law of continuation is shown by the speaker identifying himself as a servant in the previous verse and referring to Moses as a servant in this verse.

Nehemiah 1:8

Remember the word which You commanded Your servant Moses, saying, ‘If you are unfaithful I will scatter you among the peoples;

  1. This verse indicates the law of explanation by describing that unfaithfulness will lead to the “sons of Israel” being scattered “among the peoples”.
  2. The instrument that caused them to be scattered is their unfaithfulness displays the law of instrumentation.
  3. “If” is a word that connects a logical condition to being “unfaithful”.
  4. “Peoples” indicates a large body of population.
  5. “Remember” is used emotionally to ask God to recall this command.
  6. The law of particularization and generalization is used by the general being command and the particular being what happens with being unfaithful.
  7. The law of causation and substantiation is applied in the verse with the cause being “unfaithful” and the effect being “I will scatter you among the peoples.”
  8. The law of continuity is indicated by the word “commanded”.
  9. The law of preparation or introduction is used here to indicate the background on the “sons of Israel” being scattered.
  10. The law of repetition is displayed here by repeating the phrase “Your servant Moses” from the previous verse.

Nehemiah 1:9

but if you return to Me and keep My commandments and do them, though those of you who have been scattered were in the most remote part of the heavens, I will gather them from there and will bring them to the place where I have chosen to cause My name to dwell.’

  1. “But” is a contrastive conjunction indicating a continuation from the previous text.
  2. “If” is a logical word indicating a condition.
  3. Law of interchange works in this verse by the people being scattered to the remote parts of the heavens. Then to the gathering to bring them to the place God has chosen.
  4. The causation and substantiation laws are at work with the “return to Me and keep My commandments” resulting in God bringing them back together at “the place where I have chosen.”
  5. “Though” is a logical contrastive word beginning a contrastive clause.
  6. The law of contrast is used by describing people being scattered in remote parts of heaven to all of them being back together in a single place.
  7. “Where” is a local word of connection indicating a certain geographical area where God’s “name” will “dwell”.
  8. The law of repetition is used in this verse with the word “scattered” which was used in the previous verse.
  9. The law of continuation is indicated in this verse by the keeping of commandments.
  10. The law of continuation is also used here to continue the thought of God’s authority to bring the people back together that has been indicated in previous verses.
  11. “Return to Me and keep My commandments and do them” is the instrument used to show the law of instrumentation.
  12. The opportunity to go from being scattered in remote parts of the heavens to being back together and dwelling where God chose to “cause My name to dwell” indicates the law of climax.

Nehemiah 1:10

10 They are Your servants and Your people whom You redeemed by Your great power and by Your strong hand.

  1. “Great power” and “strong hand” are the instruments used to indicate how God redeemed these people which is indicative of the law of instrumentation.
  2. “Your servants” is used to show the law of repetition from previous verses talking about “the sons of Israel Your servants” in verse six.
  3. “They” and “Your people” indicates the law of continuation for the people who are to be restored back together after being scattered.
  4. The law of repetition is used in this verse in describing whose servant, whose people, who redeemed and by whose power and strong hand.
  5. The law of comparison is shown by the people being redeemed by God’s “great power” and “strong hand”.
  6. Law of cruciality is utilized in this verse as it describes redemption comes to God’s people by His “great power” and “strong hand” after they have returned to God as mentioned in the previous verse.
  7. “Great power” and “strong hand” are used to illustrate the law of instrumentation.
  8. The law of proportion is used in this verse with the words “You” and Your” to emphasize God.
  9. “Your servants” and “Your people” illustrate the law of harmony that the “sons of Israel” will once again be God’s people who received the commands as mentioned in verse six.
  10. “Your great power” and “Your strong hand” indicate the why and how of the logical structural progression in this narrative.
  11. The law of comparison is demonstrated in the phrases “Your servants” and “Your people”.

Nehemiah 1:11

11 O Lord, I beseech You, may Your ear be attentive to the prayer of Your servant and the prayer of Your servants who delight to revere Your name, and make Your servant successful today and grant him compassion before this man.” Now I was the cupbearer to the king.

  1. “I beseech You” indicates the law of repetition that had the same phrase used in verse five.
  2. “May Your ear be attentive” demonstrates the law of continuity with verse six as the speaker alters the phrasing between the two verses.
  3. “Prayer of Your servant” illustrates the law of repetition by using the same phrase as in verse six.
  4. “Your servants” illustrates the law of continuation between verses six and ten and eleven.
  5. “Now” is a temporal word of time indicating that at that time the speaker was a cupbearer to the king.
  6. The atmosphere of this verse is more of hope and strength compared to when the prayer started which had a mood of despair.
  7. “Cupbearer” indicates the type of occupation that the speaker had to the king.
  8. Law of instrumentation is demonstrated here with the instrument being compassion to do his job as cupbearer to the king.
  9. “Now I was the cupbearer to the king” indicates the law of explanation or analysis because the speaker explains who “this man” was in the previous sentence.
  10. The law of particularization and substantiation is used in this verse to indicate “the prayer of Your servant” and the particular use of the word “I” in the phrase “I beseech You”.
  11. The law of continuation continues in this verse by the speaker recognizing that God has the power to grant him compassion and success.

Part 2. Basic outline of the major structural divisions.

  1. Nehemiah’s Prayer for the Sons of Israel (1:4-7).
    1. Nehemiah mourns and prays to God (1:4).
    2. Nehemiah proclaims God’s power and keeps his covenant (1:5).
    3. Nehemiah asks God to hear his prayers so that he may confess the sins of Israel, his own and his fathers (1:6).
      1. Nehemiah asks God for His attention to hear his prayers (1:6a).
      2. Nehemiah prays on behalf of the sons of Israel to confess their sins against God (1:6b).
      3. Nehemiah confesses his sin and his father’s houses sin (1:6c).
    4. Israel has acted corruptly and not obeyed the commands given to Moses (1:7).
  2. Nehemiah Recalls the Covenant Back to God and Israel’s Redemption (1:8-11a).
    1. Nehemiah reminds God of his command to Moses (1:8-9).
      1. The law states that if they are unfaithful they will be scattered (1:8b).
      2. The law states if they are faithful to God and keeps His command that He will gather them and His name will dwell among them (1:9).
    2. Israel is redeemed by God’s power (1:10).
    3. Nehemiah asks that God listens to his prayer (1:11a).
  3. Nehemiah is the Cupbearer to the King (1:11b).

Part 3. Compare and contrast the beginning of the chapter with the end.

The beginning of the chapter starts with Nehemiah distraught and sorrowful for what has happened to the people of Israel. He humbly turns to God to pray and implore God to help Israel. Nehemiah knows that he and Israel have turned from God and have sinned against God by breaking the commands that God has given them. His heart is breaking as he deals with confessing his own sin along with his families and Israel’s. But, then as if God reminded him, Nehemiah changes themes to recall the promises of the law that God gave to Moses. He knows that if Israel returns to God, they will be restored and God will dwell among them again. As Nehemiah closes his prayer, he starts almost exactly as he did in the beginning—with humility and seeking God’s help—however this time filled with the hope and strength of God. With a renewed commitment, he knows that he needs God this day to face his challenges.

10 Observations from Acts 1:6-11

The purpose of this assignment is to make at least ten observations from the section of Acts 1:6-11. The point is to not only enhance your observation techniques but to see how a section of Scripture can all tie together. It is to see a specific verse in the greater context.

Acts 1:6

So when they had come together, they were asking Him, saying, “Lord, is it at this time You are restoring the kingdom to Israel?”

  1. “They” alludes to the “men of Galilee” mentioned in verse 11.
  2. “Lord” refers to Jesus because the “two men in white” say “this Jesus” in verse 11.
  3. The “men of Galilee” are only focused on Israel.
  4. By asking Jesus the question, the “men of Galilee” are thinking of an earthly kingdom.
  5. “They were asking Him” indicates that the whole group was interested in this question, not just one or two people.
  6. “Come together” indicates they had been apart or separated and not seen been together as a group in while.
  7. “Restoring” indicates that the kingdom was taken away or destroyed.
  8. “The Kingdom” indicates a certain kingdom with a certain purpose.
  9. “You are” indicates that the “men of Galilee” recognized his authority and power to restore the kingdom if Jesus wanted to.
  10. “Lord” indicates that they saw Jesus as a ruler or king.
  11. “Lord” indicates that they saw themselves as servants of Jesus.

Acts 1:7

He said to them, “It is not for you to know times or epochs which the Father has fixed by His own authority;

  1. “Has fixed” indicates that “the Father” set or secured an exact date.
  2. “The Father has fixed by His own authority” indicates that He knows the exact date of the restoration.
  3. “Times or epochs” is plural indicating future events.
  4. “Not for you to know” indicates that Jesus doesn’t want them to worry about the date or when the kingdom will come.
  5. “He said to them” indicates that Jesus has the ability to speak.
  6. “By His own authority” indicates He has ultimate power and decision.
  7. “Father” is capitalized indicating that it is a proper name or title.
  8. “Know” indicates the information or awareness of the time.
  9. “Own” is used with the possessive “His” to emphasize that “authority” belongs to “the Father”.
  10. There are three characters in the verse: “them” refers to the “men of Galilee”, “He” refers to “Jesus”, and “the Father”.
  11. “It” refers to the “restoring” of “the kingdom” mentioned in verse 6.

Acts 1:8

but you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be My witnesses both in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and even to the remotest part of the earth.”

  1. “But” is a contrastive conjunction indicating a continuation from the previous text.
  2. The Holy Spirit brings the power to be a witness.
  3. Three specific places are mentioned in this verse (Jerusalem, Judea and Samaria).
  4. “Remotest” is an adjective describing the command to the witnesses to go to all populations regardless of location.
  5. The result of the Holy Spirit coming is power to be witnesses in the remotest parts of the earth.
  6. The Holy Spirit has not yet come upon them.
  7. Jerusalem is mentioned first.
  8. “My witnesses” indicates that they belong to Jesus.
  9. The goal of the verse is to empower the “men of Galilee” to go be witnesses all over the earth.
  10. “When the Holy Spirit has come upon you” refers to an event that will happen.
  11. The Holy Spirit has the authority or the ability to give power.
  12. “Will receive” is a transitive verb clause that indicates the listeners will acquire or come into possession of power.
  13. “Power” in this verse indicates the strength, words, wisdom to be a witness for Jesus.
  14. “Part” is singular and the direct object of the word “remotest” to indicate a location.
  15. “Holy” indicates that the Spirit is divine.

Acts 1:9

And after He had said these things, He was lifted up while they were looking on, and a cloud received Him out of their sight.

  1. “Looking on” indicates they observed Jesus being “lifted up”.
  2. “After” is a preposition to indicate the time following Jesus speaking.
  3. “These things” indicates the sayings in verses seven and eight.
  4. “Was” is used in the third person passive with the pronoun “He” to indicate the subject of who was being “lifted up”.
  5. “Lifted” indicates being raised from a lower position to a higher position.
  6. “Up” indicates the direction of being lifted.
  7. “While” is a conjunction indicating that Jesus was being “lifted up” at the same time as they were “looking on.
  8. “Out of their sight” reiterates that the “men of Galilee” were able to watch Jesus ascend but now they could see Him no longer.
  9. “A cloud” indicates a certain, specific singular cloud.
  10. The result of Jesus saying “these things” is him being lifted up.
  11. “Received” indicates that the cloud accepted Him or was given Jesus.
  12. The independent clause is “He was lifted up while they were looking on”.
  13. “And” is a coordinating conjunction that joins the independent clause with the dependent clause.

Acts 1:10

10 And as they were gazing intently into the sky while He was going, behold, two men in white clothing stood beside them.

  1. “While He was going” indicates that it wasn’t a quick ascension, it took some time. He didn’t just vanish.
  2. “Intently” indicates that Jesus’ ascension had their full and earnest attention.
  3. “As” is a correlating conjunction indicating that while they were looking and Jesus was ascending the “two men in white” appeared.
  4. “Two” gives the exact number of “men in white clothing” that appeared.
  5. “Men” indicates the gender of these visitors.
  6. “Into the sky” refers to where they were gazing.
  7. “Behold” indicates that they saw and observed these “two men” in a sudden and remarkable way.
  8. “White” indicates the color of their clothing.
  9. “Clothing” indicates that these visitors were wearing clothes and the “men of Galilee” could see that it was clothing.
  10. “Stood beside” indicates that the “men of Galilee” were also standing.
  11. “Beside” indicates the where they were standing.

Acts 1:11

11 They also said, “Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking into the sky? This Jesus, who has been taken up from you into heaven, will come in just the same way as you have watched Him go into heaven.”

  1. “Heaven” indicates where Jesus went.
  2. “Will come” is the main verb of this sentence representing a future event that is to occur or happen.
  3. These men were also able to speak.
  4. The two men address the group as the “men of Galilee” to refer to those who Jesus addressed, visited and will receive power from the Holy Spirit.
  5. “From you” indicates a closeness, bond and friendship.
  6. This verse brings hope to the “men of Galilee” by telling them that just as they saw Jesus leave them, He will come back.
  7. This verse indicates the “way” that Jesus will return.
  8. The title “Men of Galilee” was given to the group of men, whether they were from there or not.
  9. “Into” indicates the movement of Jesus going to heaven and being surrounded or enclosed by heaven.
  10. “This Jesus” indicates the person the men just talked to and be lifted into heaven.
  11. “Why do you stand looking into the sky?” is a rhetorical question.
  12. “In” represents Jesus entering earth from heaven.

More Observations on Acts 1:8

This assignment is to perform an additional 25 observations on Acts 1:8

Acts 1:8 (NASB)

“But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be My witnesses both in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and even to the remotest part of the earth.”

  1. Jesus is the one speaking.
  2. The Holy Spirit has not yet come upon them.
  3. Jerusalem is mentioned first.
  4. “My witnesses” indicates that they belong to Jesus.
  5. “You” is used three times to indicate a personalness or familiarity.
  6. The goal of the verse is to empower the audience to go be witnesses all over the earth.
  7. “Earth” is used to indicate that Jesus wants His witnesses outside the surrounding region.
  8. Judea and Samaria are regions that are close to each other.
  9. “Even” is used in a shocking or surprising way to the audience to go beyond the boundaries of Judea and Samaria.
  10. “When the Holy Spirit has come upon you” refers to an event that will happen.
  11. “Come upon” indicates when the Holy Spirit meets the audience.
  12. They didn’t have the power yet to be witnesses since the Holy Spirit has not come to them.
  13. The independent clause starting with “but” offers the audience hope for the power to keep going.
  14. The dependent clause starting with “and” is a declarative statement that results in a command to be witnesses.
  15. “Holy” indicates that the Spirit is divine.
  16. “Spirit” indicates that it does not have a body.
  17. The ‘H’ and ‘S’ in “Holy Spirit” are capitalized indicating that it is the proper title or name.
  18. The ‘M’ in “My” is capitalized referring to Jesus and His authority, divinity, and holiness.
  19. “To” is a preposition that indicates the direction suggestive of movement toward the “remote parts of the earth.”
  20. “You” is a pronoun that indicates the group that is being addressed.
  21. “Upon” is a preposition that indicates a direct action of the Holy Spirit coming very close or arriving on the listeners.
  22. The Holy Spirit has the authority or the ability to give power.
  23. “Will receive” is a transitive verb clause that indicates the listeners will acquire or come into possession of power.
  24. “Power” in this verse indicates the strength, words, wisdom to be a witness for Jesus.
  25. “Part” is singular and the direct object of the word “remotest” to indicate a location.